Foodofsouthamerica.com - South American Foods and Desserts

Bookmark and Share

 

 

Chilean Anticuchos

Recipe

Anticuchos are a heritage of the Colony days from Peru and Chile, actually from those countries where the influence of Spanish conquerors was greater. The Spaniards used to let the slaves they brought from Africa eat the cattle parts they didn’t like, such as the heart and other internal organs. Therefore, slaves tried to make their food look as nice and attractive as possible. They cut the hearts, (after having them marinated all night before) in small pieces, and added onions and peppers for better taste. Slowly this started getting popular to other layers of society. Anticuchos were also prepared with llama meat in those days. And it was exported to all the west part of America. In Chile this got to be very popular, having different additions to make it more delicious.

Ingredients:

(All the ingredients are cut in thin slices, of about one inch per one inch.)

Different cuts of meats, or cows’ hearts, or chicken’s hearts, sausages, hot dogs, beef, or pork.
Onions
Red peppers
Cocktail tomatoes
Artichokes
Salt, pepper and oregano
Vinegar
Put in a bowl all the different kinds of meat for two or three hours, pouring over them vinegar, oregano, salt and let it soak there.
Preparation:
In brochettes sticks you put the meat, then a piece of onion, then red pepper and all this repeated. If you wish to make it fancier, you can add, cocktail tomatoes, artichokes, all cut in pieces the same size and put it in a grill to cook.
You must keep turning the sticks, so that the anticuchos are well done all around, but being careful that you don’t let them at the fire too long, because they get to be too dry.
Great to be served with mashed potatoes and salads.

Notice: don’t forget the red peppers. They are the most important ingredient, so use them in abundance.

 

 

Foodofsouthamerica.com - South American Foods and Desserts

 

 

Legal statement - Declaración legal - Privacy Policy - Política de Privacidad

Copyright www.foodofsouthamerica.com